IE Business School Online Masters
blended.team
October 17, 2011
Facilitating Successful Meetings by Mark Fritz

 

fritz9How you facilitate meetings can make a big difference on the quality of the discussions and the ultimate outcome you are to achieve.  This Six P’s will help you lead more successful meetings in the future.

1. Preparation
As in everything in life, you do a better job on anything if you do the preparation; and the same is true if you are going to lead a meeting.  There are two key actions to do in this preparation.  1) Get very clear on the outcome you want to drive in the meeting and remember to state it up front at the start of the meeting.  2) Meet some of the key participants prior to the meeting.  Especially with a meeting discussing a very emotive topic, you want to meet some of the key people beforehand and really understand their position. Understanding the position of key participants helps you to control the actual meeting much more effectively.

2. Performance
How you act in the meeting can really set the atmosphere for it.  If you speak with energy and passion, the people in the room will pick up on that and speak with energy and passion.  Very often, the people in the meeting will feed off the energy and attitude of the leader.  Therefore, as the leader, always bring in the most energy and drive into each meeting; and leave any negativity or tiredness at the door.

3. Paraphrase
People express their thoughts in different ways, and sometimes in ways that are not as meaningful to others.  When this happens, you can help others to understand better by paraphrasing what was said in a different way.  Keeping the discussions moving forward is key for meetings, and paraphrasing is one of the best ways to accomplish this.  Also, you can paraphrase negative comments of some participants into a much more constructive and productive way.  In fact, paraphrasing negative comments can be one of the most important skills to help keep the discussions moving forward and not letting a particular negative comment destroy what was a good discussion.

4. Prompt
Many times you will lead meetings where you know some of the people really have some good ideas to share, but just don’t speak up.  As the leader, you can pick them and ask if they have any ideas they would like to share.  Also, if you did your preparation and spoke to them prior to the meeting, you can then say to them “John, remember you had this idea when we talked this past week – could you share that with the others”.  The problem is never that there are not enough good ideas in the room, but that people don’t always share them.  Prompting gets more information out of everyone that could be useful for getting a better outcome from the meeting.

5. Pre-empt
Now, the next P is the opposite of prompting.  Here you want to pre-empt some possible negative comments from someone in the meeting. Again, if you have done your preparation, you would have talked to the people who you thought might be negative in the meeting.  When they begin to express their negative thoughts, you then “pre-empt” them by saying “yes John, when we met this past week you said that…..”.  This gives you a way to share what John wanted to say, but in a much less confrontational way.  However, remember that to pre-empt someone in a polite way you must have talked to the meeting where they expressed that thought.

6. Position
Where you stand in the room and how you move around the room can either help or hinder the conversations.  If you are in the middle and constantly moving around to help drive the conversation, you are then really controlling it as well.  Sometimes you need to back away in a corner if the conversations are being productive and don’t really need your help.  Also, there’s a great way to control people who are speaking too much.  Why don’t you just stand in front of them for a few minutes and you take them out of the conversation quite naturally.  That’s not something you want to do often, but there always comes the times when someone is just being too disruptive.

Remember these six P’s for the next time you need to lead a meeting, and you will drive it to a much more successful outcome.

PreparationPerformanceParaphrasePromptPre-emptPosition

 


blended.team
July 7, 2011
The Elevator Game

The Elevator

Would you like to excel at your job? Why don’t you give this game a try?

The Elevator is a game which offers an easy structured simulation with a wide range of realistic dilemmas that may occur in modern organizations. The student begins the game, and consequently his/her career from an entry level position at a fictitious company which should be the company of your dreams.
Students will have to face different situations, ethical issues and they will have to make their own decisions and see how their performance leads them to climb the hierarchy at work or not. An excellent performance could mean that a top management position could be reached in the organization and why not become the CEO of the company. Is this one of your challenges?
Many students have already played the game an it fosters the class discussion on the Organizational Behaviour courses of our Master Programmes. Furthermore, we have also launched a Facebook app so everybody is free to play The Elevator.
To access the material you can click on the following link and to access the Facebook app click on:

http://apps.facebook.com/ie_the_elevator/


blended.team
June 28, 2011
Food For Thought! by Mark Fritz

Mark Fritz 

One of our outstanding visitor teachers in Leadership, Mark Fritz, has collected his “daily thoughts” for IE Business School in this weekly newsletter Food For Thought

With more of 25 years of international experience in Management, Prof. Fritz  is also the author of Time to Get Started, a compilation of the best of his Daily Thoughts and  of The Truth About Getting Things Done, 42 Truths that combines the best from both time management and motivation books, and provides you with practical ideas and insights that enable you to take action from today

 

 

 

WEEKLY FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Personal Development

“I do not think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday.”  Abraham Lincoln

Learning Every Day

You are never too old to stop learning, and we should all look to learn

something new every day. I had read a number of years ago that a great

question to ask your children each night is: “What did you learn at school

today?”

 Let’s ask the question of ourselves: What have I learned today? 

Leadership Development

“The first responsibility of a leader is to define reality. The last is to say thank you.” Max DePree

Thank You

Saying “Thank You” is important for leaders. Thank you shows that you

appreciated what your people have done. That appreciation helps your people to develop pride in their work, and pride is one of the best motivators of performance.

Thank you – two words with magical powers.

Team & Organisational Development

“No matter what accomplishments you make, somebody helped you.”  Althea Gibson

Team – it’s all about Helping each other

You can spot a successful team in minutes. It’s the team with members that

are always trying to help each other, and you see it in the behaviours of

everyone. They are asking each other questions and sharing ideas with each

other all the time.

How much have you helped your team members this past week?

Something for Fun

“I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book.” Groucho Marx

Food for Thought to help “Fuel” your personal growth from Mark Fritz (www.markfritzonline.com) 


 
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